CTE

Mrs. Hannan mhannan@massac.org

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SCIENCES

Please Note: Not all courses are offered every year. Course offerings are based on student interest 

Health 512: Introduction to Health Science

Credits: 1

Level: Freshmen, Sophomore, or Junior

Prerequisite: None

This class provides in depth information into health careers. Students will also develop core knowledge related to many health occupations, such as, the history of health care, health care communications, safety practices, legal and ethical principles, culture in health care, employability skills and some anatomy and physiology.

 

Health 530: Health Occupations I (Nurse Assisting)

Credits: 1

Level: Junior or Senior

Prerequisite: None

This class teaches skills and information related to patient care through the classroom lab, lecture, and direct patient care at local community health care facilities. Those students that successfully complete the class work and 21 required skills* will be eligible to take the IL Department of Public Health Nurse Aide Training Competency Evaluation written exam. After passing the exam, the student's name will be included in the IL Department of Public Health Registry of Certified Nurse Aides.  Students may then be employed as a Certified Nurse Assistant at any health care facility in the state of Illinois. The competency exam will cost the student approximately $50.00.  A uniform (approx. $35.00) is required, and a stethoscope (approx. $20.00) is optional.  Students who will be providing patient care must be of good character. Good attendance and grade of "C" must be maintained to be eligible for the state exam. Those with hearing difficulties should see the instructor before electing this class. 21 Required Skills: wash hands, perform oral hygiene, perform hair care, shave a resident, perform nail care, take an oral temperature, take pulse, measure respiration, measure blood pressure, make an unoccupied bed, make an occupied bed, feed a resident, dress a resident, make a final unit check, measure weight, measure height, place a resident in side-lying position, perform passive range of motion, calculate input and output, and transfer resident to wheelchair using a safety belt.

 

Health 541: Health Occupations II (Medical Terminology)

Credits: 2

Level: Senior

Prerequisite: Either Health Occupations Related Skills or Health Occupations I GPA of 3.0 in Health Occupations classes Overall GPA of 2.4 or instructor’s permission, Senior status, driver’s license, transportation and parental consent

Health Science II is for those mature senior students with an occupational interest in health care, who desire to further their knowledge in health care by learning the medical vocabulary of body systems and medical and surgical specialty. This self study class is limited to seniors who have taken either Nurse Assisting or Intro to Health Science, have a GPA of 3.0 in Health Science, or an overall GPA of 2.4 with the instructor's permission. Limit 4 students.

 

DEPARTMENT OF VOCATIONAL FAMILY & CONSUMER SCIENCE

The Department of Vocational Family & Consumer Science includes a sequence of courses planned to provide experiences necessary to successfully combine the occupation of homemaking and wage earning. Included are decision-making processes and the development of attitudes and behaviors that enhance the quality of life at home and at work. Applied math, communication skills, and employability skills are incorporated in all courses.

 Please Note: Not all courses are offered every year. Course offerings are based on student interest 


H. EC. 610: Learning for Independence, Family & Employment (LIFE) 

Credits: ½ - First Semester

Level: Freshman or Sophomore

This course introduces the student to the field of Family and Consumer Sciences. It focuses on the total well-being of the person. Students learn the importance of taking care of all aspects of their health (physical, social, emotional, and mental) and will learn the skills necessary to become a healthy, well-adjusted, self-confident individual, family member, and worker. Students will learn about positive and negative behaviors that impact their health, how to develop healthy relationships and how to deal with unhealthy relationships, how to manage their resources wisely, and the basics of child development and parenting. Students will learn the importance of making wise-decisions and the steps necessary to make good decisions. Students will also do career research and participate in discussions about current events impacting their lives.

 

H. EC. 620: Food and Nutrition I

Credits: ½ - Second Semester

Level: Freshman or Sophomore

The emphasis of this course is basic nutrition and food preparation skills. Students will learn the importance of good eating habits as well as daily exercise to achieve and maintain a state of wellness. Students will learn the names, use, and care of kitchen equipment, proper measuring techniques, cooking techniques, safety and sanitation in the kitchen, and the principles of microwave cooking. Students will also learn to manage their resources wisely in relation to nutrition and food preparation. 

 

H. EC. 622: Food and Nutrition II

Credits: ½ - First Semester

Level: Sophomore, Junior or Senior

 

The emphasis of this course is nutrition throughout the lifecycle. This course will prepare students to make smart decisions about food that will affect the health and well-being of themselves and their families. Students will learn about the six classes of nutrients, why each nutrient is needed, how much of each nutrient is needed, and the best food sources of each nutrient. Students will learn about food patterns and customs of other cultures and how foods from other cultures can fit into their diet. Other topics covered will include weight control, nutrition for athletes, and eating disorders.

 

H. EC. 621: Child Development 

Credits: ½ - Second Semester

Level: Sophomore, Junior or Senior

This course teaches about the child from conception to school-age. Emphasis is on the physical, social, emotional, and mental growth and development of children. Parenting skills and child-care skills are also included. 

 

H.E.C. 631: Food Service 

Credits: 1

Level: Junior or Senior

This course helps prepare students for occupations in the food service industry. Students will learn about career opportunities in food preparation and service, the principles of menu planning, standardization, cost control, and safety and sanitation. Students will review the basic food preparation skills learned in Food and Nutrition I and then plan and participate in food preparation labs. 


 


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DEPARTMENT OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE


The Department of Agriculture Occupations offers courses a wide variety of courses that cover the practical operations, procedures and practical skills needed in agriculture related occupations. Students who enroll in the Ag program will have the opportunity to explore the practical and business aspects of Agriculture, Horticulture, Industrial Mechanics, and Scientific and Conservation Careers. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcements of academic concepts.

Please Note: Not all courses are offered every year. Course offerings are based on student interest 


Ag. Occ. 110: Agricultural Industries

Credits: 1

Level: Freshman or Sophomore

 

This orientation course provides an opportunity for students to learn how the agricultural industry is organized; its major components; the economic influence of agriculture at state, national, and international levels, and the scope and types of job opportunities in the agricultural field.  Basic concepts in animal science, plant sciences, soil science, horticulture, natural resources, agribusiness management, agricultural mechanics, agricultural bio technology, food science technology, environmental science and aquaculture science and technology will be presented.

 

Ag. Occ. 111: Basic Agricultural Science

Credits: 1

Level: Freshman or Sophomore

 

This orientation course builds on basic skills and knowledge gained in the Introduction to the Agricultural Industry course. Major units of instruction include advanced plant science, soil science, and agricultural mechanics. Applied science and math skills and concepts will be stressed throughout the course as they relate to each area. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

 

Ag. Occ. 113: Supervised Occupational Experience I

Credits: ½

Level: Freshman, Sophomore, or Junior

 

This course is designed to establish knowledge and skills in various agricultural careers.

Students will gain credit by establishing a project at their home, at a local business, or at their school, usually after normal school hours. Example projects may include, but are not limited to: working in a garden center, raising vegetables/grain/livestock, conducting agri-science experiments in a greenhouse, and training horses in a stable. Students will be required to verify their experiences by keeping written or computerized records including: business agreements, budget inventories, daily activities, hours worked, income and expenses, total earning, depreciation, and net worth. Instructor supervision will be conducted to the student’s home or place of employment. SAE records should be evaluated at least once a month. In addition, SAE lessons are integrated in each agricultural course. SAE participation can lead to fulltime employment, scholarships, and awards through the FFA.

 


Ag. Occ. 122: Natural Resources Management and Conservation

Credits: 1

Level: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior

Prerequisite: Ag. Industries or Basic Agricultural Science

 

This course develops management and conservation skills in understanding the connection between agricultural and natural resources. Student knowledge and skills are developed in: understanding natural resources and its importance; fish, wildlife, forestry management and conservation; and exploring outdoor recreational enterprises. Hunting and fishing as a sport, growing and managing tree forests, and outdoor safety education will be featured. Career exploration will be discussed including: park ranger game warden, campground manager, forester conservation officer, wildlife manager, and related occupations.

 

Ag. Occ. 130: Agricultural Mechanics and Technology

Credits: 1

Level: Junior, or Senior

Prerequisite: Ag. Industries or Basic Agricultural Science

 

This course will concentrate on expanding student’s knowledge and experiences with agricultural mechanics technologies utilized in the agricultural industry. Units of instruction included are: design, construction, fabrication, maintenance, welding, electricity/electronics, internal combustion engines, hydraulics, and employability skills. Careers of agricultural construction engineer, electrician, plumber, welder, equipment designer, parts manager, safety inspector, welder and other related occupations will be examined. Improving workplace and computer skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA will lead o several opportunities to put the skills learned in this class to work by entering contests, SAE projects and scholarship opportunities.

 

Ag. Occ. 131: Supervised Occupational Experience II

Credits: ½

Level: Junior or Senior

 

This experienced program is for 11th and 12th grade agricultural students. The opportunities and responsibilities are similar to those discussed under Supervised Occupational Experience I with the exception that the experiences are conducted at a more advanced level of skill training. The project should be expanded as the student progresses through the agricultural program.

 

Ag. Occ. 133: Agricultural Business Management

Credits: 1

Level: Junior or Senior

Prerequisite: Ag. Industries or Basic Agricultural Science

 

This course will develop students understanding of the agricultural industry relating to the United States and World marketplace. Instructional Units include: marketing and trading of agricultural products, international agriculture, imports and exports, agricultural law, taxes, governmental regulations and places, and advanced computerized record keeping. Student’s skills will be enhanced in math, reading comprehension, and writing through agribusiness applications. Employability skills will be developed with resume’ writing through agribusiness applications and interviewing techniques to gain employment. Post-secondary education will be explored at agricultural colleges and universities. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.

 

Ag. Occ. 134: Green House Production and Floral Design

Credits: 1

Level: Sophomore, Junior, or Senior

Prerequisite: Basic Agricultural Science

 

This course focuses on the greenhouse management, floral design and related segments of the horticulture industry. Major units of study include floriculture plant identification, greenhouse structures, and the culture of greenhouse crops. Also included are care and handling of cut flowers, principles of art applied floral design and the mechanics of floral design. Agribusiness units will be introduced in merchandising, advertising, sales, and operating a retail floral business. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus. Participation in FFA will lead to several opportunities to compete in horticultural contests statewide.


DEPARTMENT OF VOCATIONAL TRADE AND INDUSTRY (T&I)

Trade and Industry is a phase of technical education that offers a broad variety of shop experience to students interested in attaining knowledge and skills common to industry. The experiences gained are generally provided through manipulative exercises that are utilized by industry. Beginning students start with exploratory type classes and progress through occupational areas.

 Please Note: Not all courses are offered every year. Course offerings are based on student interest

Industrial Arts: Ori. to Ind.Tech 1311 (Shop I)

Credits: 1

Level: Freshman, Sophomore, or Junior

Students will use the basic principles of drafting including using a T square, scale, compass, and triangles. They will be required to measure accurately to the 1/16“ and add and subtract fractions of an inch and draw single view as well as orthographic drawings. Before going into the wood shop all students must pass a general safety and a safety test for tools that will be used. Students will learn basic woodworking techniques from the start of a project to the finish product including a plan of procedure, bill of material, layout, sawing, drilling, sanding, assembly, staining, varnishing. Students will study the basic principles of electricity from conductors and insulators to volts, amps, and ohms. They will use ohm`s law to find current, voltage, and resistance in a circuit. Students will wire a simple 120 volt circuit including wiring an outlet, single switch, and light plus wiring a 3 way switch and light. Students will study general information about metal shop including metal shop safety, measuring, and layout tools, using a spot welder, arc welder, and oxyacetylene torch to cut metal.  There is a Shop fee of $5.00 plus the cost of materials for project.

T&I. 1321. Production Technology (Welding/Wood Const) Shop II

Credits: 1

Level: Sophomore or Junior

Prerequisite: Or. To Industrial Technology

This course emphasizes the production of metal products using electric arc, and oxy-acetylene welding equipment and the production of wood products using power woodworking machinery.

Through a variety of learning opportunities, students are exposed to many career opportunities in the production field. Experiences in manufacturing include product design, materials and processes, tools and equipment, including computers, safety procedures, corporate structure, management, research and development, production planning, mass production, marketing and servicing. Welding fee $5.00, Wood fee $2.50, plus cost of materials for projects. 


T & I. 1334: Auto Mechanics I, Automotive Technology

Credits: 2

Level: Junior or Senior

Prerequisite: Or. To Ind. Tech.

This automotive services program is an integrated sequence of organized learning experiences that include theory, laboratory, and shop work related to the maintenance, adjustment, and repair of automotive vehicles.

 

T & I. 1342: Auto Mechanics II, Automotive Technology

Credits: 2

Level: Junior or Senior

Prerequisite: Auto Mechanics I

An extension of Auto Mechanics I with additional emphasis on developing competency in the skill areas related to mechanics.

 

CO. OCC. 1346: Interrelated Cooperative Education Occupations

Credits: 3

Level: Senior

Interrelated Cooperative Education is designed for senior students interested in pursuing careers in vocational occupations. Students are released from school for their paid cooperative education work experience and participate in 200 minutes per week of related classroom instruction. Classroom instruction focuses on providing students with job survival skills and career exploration skills related to the job and improving students’ abilities to interact positively with others. For skills related to the job, refer to the skill development course outlines and the task list of the desired occupational program. A qualified vocational cooperative education coordinator is responsible for supervision.

Written training agreements and individual student training plans are developed and agreed upon by the employer, student and coordinator. The coordinator, student and employer assume compliance with federal, state and local laws and regulations. The course content includes the following broad areas of emphasis: further career education opportunities, planning for the future, job-seeking skills, personal development, human relationships, legal protection and responsibilities, economics and the job, organizations, and job termination. Classroom instruction is based on the tasks in an occupational cluster.

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